Terms related to telecom, including definitions about telecommunication service providers and words and phrases about voice, video and Internet communication.

ACD – AUTOMATIC CALL DISTRIBUTOR

Automatic Call Distribution or ACD, is a tool commonly used in the telephony industry.  ACD systems are commonly found in any office that handles a large volume of inbound calls. The primary purpose of an ACD is to disperse incoming calls to agents or employees with specific skills.

ADSL – ASYNCHRONOUS DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE

Asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) is a type of digital subscriber line (DSL) technology, a data communications technology that enables faster data transmission over copper telephone lines (standard fixed lines) rather than a conventional voice band modem can provide.

ACR – ADVANCED CALL ROUTING or CALL MANAGEMENT

In telecommunications, call routing, or call management is the process of designing and implementing rules and parameters governing the routing of inbound telephone calls through a network. These rules can specify how calls are distributed according to the time and/or date of the call as well as the location of the caller (usually defined by the outbound Caller ID).

Call routing and management involves the use of Calling Features such as Call Queues, IVR Menus, Hunt Groups and Recorded Announcements to provide a customised experience for the caller and to maximize the efficiency of inbound call handling.

ANALOG SIGNALS

An analog or analogue signal is any continuous signal for which the time varying feature (variable) of the signal is a representation of some other time varying quantity.  It differs from a digital signal, in which the continuous quantity is a representation of a sequence of discrete values which can only take on one of a finite number of values.   The term analog signal usually refers to electrical signals; however, mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic, human speech, and other systems may also convey or be considered analog signals.

BANDWIDTH

Internet bandwidth is the channel speed or maximum throughput of your digital connection to the Internet. It is usually measured in Mbp/s (millions of bits per second or megabits per second).

This table shows the maximum bandwidth of common Internet access technologies:

1.5 Mbit/s           ADSL

4 Mbit/s               ADSL1

10 Mbit/s            Ethernet

24 Mbit/s            ADSL2+

100 Mbit/s          Fast Ethernet

1 Gbit/s Gigabit Ethernet

BROADBAND

In telecommunications, broadband is a wide bandwidth data transmission with an ability to simultaneously transport multiple signals and traffic types. The medium can be coaxial cable, optical fiber, radio or twisted pair.

In the context of Internet access broadband is used much more loosely to mean any high-speed Internet access that is always on and faster than traditional dial-up access.

CALL BARGING

To seamlessly take over a call when required from other users on a telephone system.

CALL MANAGEMENT OR ADVANCED CALL ROUTING

In telecommunications, call routing, or call management is the process of designing and implementing rules and parameters governing the routing of inbound telephone calls through a network. These rules can specify how calls are distributed according to the time and/or date of the call as well as the location of the caller (usually defined by the outbound Caller ID).

Call routing and management involves the use of Calling Features such as Call Queues, IVR Menus, Hunt Groups and Recorded Announcements to provide a customised experience for the caller and to maximize the efficiency of inbound call handling

CALL MONITORING

Call monitoring allows calls to be monitored in real time which can be useful as a training tool.

CALL RECORDING

Keep records of conversations for later playback and analysis.  Call recording is governed by a number of different pieces of UK legislation.  For further details please refer to www.ofcom.org.uk

CALL WHISPERING

This facility enables the coaching of staff on a call without the caller hearing what is being said.

CALLER ID SCREEN POP UP

This is a great feature enabling you to see who is calling you on your screen.

CLI – CALLING LINE IDENTITY

A telephone service that transmits a caller’s number to the called party’s telephone. Where available, CLI can also provide a name associated with the calling telephone number.

CLICK-TO-DIAL

One-click operation gives customers the quickest solution in making calls. Customers can Click-to-dial from numbers in emails, Microsoft Office applications, web pages or any electronic data form.

CONFERENCING

Conferencing or a conference call, is a telephone call in which someone talks to several people at the same time.  Conference calls may be designed to allow the called party to participate during the call, or the call may be set up so that the called party merely listens into the call and cannot speak.

CODEC

Codecs are used to convert an analog voice signal to digitally encoded version. Codecs vary in the sound quality, the bandwidth required, the computational requirements, etc.  Each service, program, phone, gateway, etc typically supports several different codecs, and when talking to each other, negotiate which codec they will use.

DATA LINKING (WEB & CRM)

Integrate existing Outlook contacts into other applications to include VoIP solutions.

DDI – DIRECT DIAL INBOUND

A service whereby a call made to a DDI number is routed directly to an internal extension.

DECT – DIGITAL ENHANCED CORDLESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS

A standard that allows cordless portable phones to connect to one or more base stations, either domestically or in a corporate environment.

DIGITAL SIGNAL

A digital signal is a signal that represents a sequence of discrete values.   A logic signal is a digital signal with only two possible values and describes an arbitrary bit stream.   A received digital signal may be impaired by noise and distortions without necessarily affecting the digits.  With digital signals, system noise, provided it is not too great, will not change the quantification whereas with signals handled using analog processing, noise always degrades the operation to some degree.

DISASTER RECOVERY

Processes that are in place and implemented to allow the continued use of the service should a system go down.  Being cloud based, VoIP telephony services can be set up anywhere within a very short timescale making this service an integral part of any business disaster recovery plan.

DYNAMIC LINE ALLOCATION

Increase or decrease the number of lines on your system, quickly and easily.

EMAIL 2 FAX

Send faxes directly to a fax machine via your email.

EMAIL 2 SMS

Send SMS messages via your email.

FAX 2 EMAIL

Receiving faxes without a fax machine via email.  A fax is sent from a fax machine to a ‘virtual’ fax number which is routed to a specified email address, which then receives the fax as an email attachment.

GATEWAY

A VoIP gateway is a network device that converts voice and fax calls, in real time, between the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and an IP network.

HONEYCOMMS

We are your friendly and affordable telecommunications provider.  Keeping you connected!

HOSTED SERVICE

A telephony service where the functions normally fulfilled by a PBX on the customer’s premises are provided by a system housed remotely owned and managed by a service provider.

HOSTED TELEPHONY PACKAGE

Honeycomms’ business telephony solution that requires no onsite hardware.

IAX – INTER-ASTERISK EXCHANGE

Inter-Asterisk exchange (IAX) is a communications protocol native to the Asterisk private branch exchange (PBX) software.   It is used for transporting VoIP telephony sessions between servers and to terminal devices.  Referred to as IAX Trunk Inbound or IAX trunk Outbound.

INTERNET

The Internet is a global system of interconnected computer networks that use the standard Internet Protocol Suite (TCP/IP) to serve billions of users worldwide.  The Internet has no centralized governance in either technological implementation or policies for access and usage; each constituent network sets its own policies.  Only the overreaching definitions of the two principal name spaces in the Internet, the Internet Protocol address space and the Domain Name System (DNS), are directed by a maintainer organization, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN).

IP PBX – INTERNET PROTOCOL PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE

A IP PBX is a business telephone system designed to deliver voice over a data network and interoperate with the normal Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN).

IP TELEPHONY

IP telephony is a telephone system that operates over a data network using the Internet Protocol.

ISDN – INTEGRATED SERVICES DIGITAL NETWORK

The key feature of the ISDN is that it integrates speech and data on the same lines, adding features that were not available in the ‘classic’ telephone system.

IVR – INTERACTIVE VOICE RESPONSE

Interactive voice response is a virtual receptionist to help your calls be answered as effectively as possible.  This service normally operates by giving callers options from a menu from which they can choose to route the call to specific departments or offices.

LEAST COST ROUTING

The process that provides customers with the cheapest telephone calls costs by routing via the best method.

LOGGING & REPORTING

There are various levels of reporting available, allowing you to manage your call records.  VoIP call records are available instantly.

MPLS – MULTI PROTOCOL LABEL SWITCHING

MPLS is a type of data-carrying technique for high-performance telecommunications networks that directs data from one network node to the next based on short path labels rather than long network addresses, avoiding complex lookups in a routing table.

MPLS QOS GUARANTEED

Quality of Service, guaranteed call quality and ability to make/receive 5 concurrent calls.

MUSIC ON HOLD

Callers can be played music while they are on hold.  Music may be changed if required, although license fees and restrictions may apply.  Refer tohttps://www.gov.uk/licences-to-play-background-music

PAUSE/UNPAUSE CALL RECORDING

Option to switch call recording on/off, such as when dealing with sensitive information.

PBX – PRIVATE BRANCH EXCHANGE

A PBX is a in-house telephone switching system that interconnects telephone extensions to each other, as well as to the outside telephone network.

POE – POWER OVER ETHERNET

Power over Ethernet technology is a system to transmit electrical power, along with data, to remote devices over standard twisted-pair cable in an Ethernet network. This technology is useful for powering IP telephones, wireless LAN access points and other appliances where it would be inconvenient, expensive or infeasible to have a separate power supply.

PORTAL

Web portal or public portal refers to a Web site or service that offers a broad array of resources and services, such as e-mail, forums, search engines, and online shopping malls. Most of the traditional search engines have transformed themselves into Web portals to attract and keep a larger audience.

A client portal is an electronic gateway to a collection of digital files, services, and information, accessible over the Internet through a web browser. The term is most often applied to a sharing mechanism between an organization and its clients.

An enterprise portal is a Web-based interface for users of enterprise applications. Enterprise portals also provide access to enterprise information such as corporate databases, applications (including Web applications), and systems.

PSTN – PUBLIC SWITCHED TELEPHONE NETWORK

The Public Switched Telephone Network is the telephone network generally available to the public and is the backbone for virtually all public landline communication.

QOS – QUALITY OF SERVICE

VoIP can guarantee high-quality voice transmission only if the voice packets, for both the signalling and audio channel, are given priority over other kinds of network traffic.  For VoIP to be deployed so that users receive an acceptable level of voice quality, VoIP traffic must be guaranteed certain compensating bandwidth, latency, and jitter requirements.  QoS ensures that VoIP voice packets receive the preferential treatment they require.

RAID – REDUNDANT ARRAY OF INDEPENDENT DISKS

RAID is a technology that employs the simultaneous use of two or more hard disk drives to achieve greater levels of performance, reliability, and/or larger data volume sizes.

REMOTE DESKTOP

In computing, the term remote desktop refers to a software or operating system feature that allows a personal computer’s desktop environment to be run remotely on one system (usually a PC, but the concept applies equally to a server), while being displayed on a separate client device.

Remote desktop applications have varying features.  Some allow attaching to an existing user’s session (i.e., a running desktop) and “remote controlling”, either displaying the remote control session or blanking the screen. Taking over a desktop remotely is a form of remote administration.

SDSL – SYNCHRONOUS DIGITAL SUBSCRIBER LINE

Symmetric digital subscriber line (SDSL) refers to digital subscriber line (DSL) technologies, that is, technologies for transmission of digital data over the copper wires of the telephone network where the bandwidth in the downstream direction, from the network to the subscriber, is identical to the bandwidth in the upstream direction, from the subscriber to the network.

This symmetric bandwidth can be considered to be the opposite of the asymmetric bandwidth offered by asymmetric digital subscriber line (ADSL) technologies, where the upstream bandwidth is lower than the downstream bandwidth.  SDSL is generally marketed at business customers, while ADSL is marketed at private as well as business customers

SIP – SESSION INITIATION PROTOCOL

Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is a communications protocol for signalling and controlling multimedia communication sessions.  The most common applications of SIP are in Internet telephony for voice and video calls, as well as instant messaging, over Internet Protocol (IP) networks.

SIP HANDSETS

A SIP handset is a device that uses SIP as its method of transmitting and receiving voice traffic, such as an Yealink IP phone.

SIP TRUNKING

ISDN replacement service, that allows multiple lines over a single high speed Internet connection.

UNIFIED MESSAGING

The integration of different types of electronic messages (e.g. voice, fax, video, email) into a single mailbox or inbox, making it more convenient for the user to access.

VIRTUAL PBX

A PBX not in your premises but hosted elsewhere, by Honeycomms for instance.

VOICEMAIL 2 EMAIL

Voicemail messages are sent directly to a specified email as a sound file attachment.

VOICEMAIL

Voicemail systems provide a method of recording messages when you are on the phone, away from your desk for retrieval later.

VOIP – VOICE OVER IP

Voice over Internet Protocol; making and receiving phone calls over your broadband internet.

VPN – VIRTUAL PRIVATE NETWORK

A process whereby software is used to create what appears as a private network running over a public network.  VPNs are typically used to support an organisations internal private data communications to off-site locations such as branch offices and to home-based employees.

WI-FI

A wireless Ethernet technology that allows people with portable devices to connect to the internet while out and about in Wi-Fi “hot spots”.

Devices which can use Wi-Fi technology include personal computers, video-game consoles, smartphones, digital cameras, tablet computers and digital audio players.  Wi-Fi compatible devices can connect to the Internet via a WLAN network and a wireless access point. Such an access point (or hotspot) has a range of about 20 meters (66 feet) indoors and a greater range outdoors.  Hotspot coverage can be as small as a single room with walls that block radio waves, or as large as many square kilometres achieved by using multiple overlapping access points.

WLAN – WIRELESS LOCAL AREA NETWORK

A wireless local area network (WLAN) is a wireless computer network that links two or more devices using a wireless distribution method within a limited area such as a home, school, computer laboratory, or office building.  This gives users the ability to move around within a local coverage area and still be connected to the network, and can provide a connection to the wider Internet. Most modern WLANs are marketed under the Wi-Fi brand name.

WAP – WIRELESS ACCESS POINT

A wireless access point (WAP) is a networking hardware device that allows a Wi-Fi compliant device to connect to a wired network. The WAP usually connects to a router (via a wired network) as a standalone device, but it can also be an integral component of the router itself.  A WAP is differentiated from a hotspot, which is the physical location where Wi-Fi access to a WLAN is available.

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